Sofala - Turon Goldfield History: Contemporary newspaper extracts highlight the development of the Turon goldfield in 1851

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Sofala - Turon goldfield history, 1851

The diggings on the Turon River sprang into life just 6 weeks after the announcement of payable gold being discovered at Ophir in May 1851. The Turon quickly became THE name field of the opening year of the goldrush and the town of Sofala was quickly established alongside the alluvial miner's claims.

"It appears that Schofield, who belonged to a party of seven, worked nearly a fortnight at the Ophir diggings, and obtained 10 ounces, but on Monday last they left that place and started for the Turon, where they realised about 30 ounces in about three days."

18 June 1851

GOLD DIGGING NEWS

The purchases of gold by Messrs. Austin and Dunsford, during the week ending on Saturday the 14th instant, have not been to a very considerable amount, being in the whole about £450 ; Mr. Austin’s purchases amounting to £227, and Mr. Duns ford’s to £220 ... Other parties have no doubt purchased ; in fact, there is a rumour that £500 worth was sold on Thursday or Friday last, but I am not in a position to Btate that such was actually the case.

The purchases made by the above-named gentlemen arc, however, more particularly worthy of notice, inasmuch as a portion of the gold was obtained from the Turon, which locality has for some little time boon spoken of as abounding with golden deposits.

Mr Austin purchased 3j ounces, rought from thence ; Mr. Dunsford’s pur chase was considerably larger, as it weighed upwards of thirty ounces. It was brought in on Snturday, by a person named George Scho field.

It appears that Schofield, who belonged to a party of seven, worked nearly a fortnight at the Ophir diggings, and obtained 10 ounces, but on Monday last they left that place and started for the Turon, where they realised about 30 ounces in about three days. Of course the statement that it was ob tained at the Turon rests solely on the credi bility of Schofield and his party ; but I find, upon making inquiry, that there is no good reason for doubting that such is the fact. They were known to have left Summerhill Creek on the Monday, and on the Saturday following they appear in Bathurst with 16 ounces which they got nt the Ophir diggings, and 30 ounces found at the Turon, The gold obtained at the latter place is, moreover, of a different shade of colour, being considerably darker than the specimens I have seen from Ophir. The exact spot where Schofield secured nis prize is, as a matter of course, a secret ; but most probably it was in or near the bed of the Turon river, possibly at the junction with that river of one of the numerous creeks or ravines intersect ing that part of the country. The secret, however, is not likely to be long confined to him and his party, for I hear that some of our restless spirits are already on the qui vive, and propose an immediate visit. The mountains there, I understand, abound with quartz rock, which appears to be an almost certain indication of the presence of gold.

"The Ophir Diggings are by no means exhausted, but everything connected with them has lost its novelty.

"There is a magic charm about the mystery in which as yet the unknown and untold wealth of the Turon diggings is enveloped. People enquire as eagerly for the latest intelligence from the terra incognita, incognita as regards its mineral resources, as if their very existence and happiness depended upon it."

20 June 1851

MINING INTELLIGENCE. (From the Bathurst Free Press.)

Discoveries of gold deposits in the Turon, which are said to be very rich, are at present the current topics of conversation in Bathurst.

The Ophir Diggings are by no means exhausted, but everything connected with them has lost its novelty

There is a magic charm about the mystery in which as yet the unknown and untold wealth of the Turon diggings is enveloped. People enquire as eagerly for the latest intelligence from the terra incognita, incognita as regards its mineral resources, as if their very existence and happiness depended upon it.”

What nows from the Turon - have you heard anything from the Turon ?” assail you at every corner of the street, and because we are not prepared with a peren nial well-spring of intelligence, we are unable to confirm the current extravagancies and im probabilities everywhere afloat about the Turon, n doubtful glance from beneath the eyelids, tell us distinctly as if spoken, that we arc suspected of concealing the truth, and that we know much moro than we choose to com municate.

As regards the Turon, we shall briefly state all we know of the matter. It was generally rumoured some ten or a dozen days ago, that Messrs. Stutchbury and Piper had started from the diggings for the Turon, and that they had discovered very rich ground.

The attention of many parties was in consequence attracted to that quarter. Rumours were rife on all sides that numbers were at work there, and doing a profitable business. One party of “several men who had been very fortunate at Ophir, were known to have left a very productive spot, with the in tention of exploring the creeks and gullies of the Turon, and as they did not return, the circumstance was regarded as presumptive proof that they were doing what is termed “ a good stroke.” Mr. Richards’ overseer, Mr. Bedford, who had been prospecting above the Turon ranges, succeeded in dis covering gold in many places.

Mr. Mur nane, who has charge of Mr. Suttor’s sheep establishment, was equally successful in an other quarter, and wrote his employer the particulars of his explorations, and at the same time suggested the propriety of return ing a flock of fat wethers lo the station, which was intended for the market, as ho fcty convinced that when the discovery of gold existing in such plenty, becami publicly known, the mutton would be required to supply the gold-diggers of the Turon.

Tho next circumstance which carne prominently before the public, was the arrival in town of an ounce of the precious metal about the latter part of last week, the produce of the Turon.

The bearer of this was Air. Richards, who has stations there, and from having been in the ‘ survey department, is conversant with all the localities. On Saturday last, Mr. George Schofield sold 30ozs, lOdwts. 5grs., which himself and party had obtained in the Turon, for £93 18s. 7id. Mr. Dunsford was the pur chaser. The fact, therefore, of gold existing in the Turon, and in sufficieut quantity to remunerate the labour expended upon it, appears to be established beyond a doubt. The parties, whose names we have given, .ire all respectable, and would not lend themselves to anything like deception.

The consequence of this discovery being made public, has been a diversion of many new arrivals in that direction. Parties are also leaving the Ophir diggings for the Turon, so that in a short time, should the new field prove as profitable as is anticipated, the population of Ophir will be materially thinned, and an opportunity will then be offered of establishing something like regu larity and system.

As it is the order of the day with the Syd ney newspaper proprietors to dispatch what are termed “special correspondents” to the diggings, we seo no earthly reason why our little sheet should be deprived of this little bit of ostentation. Well, then, our “ special correspondent” has started for the Turon, and we hope to be shortly enabled to place our readers in possession of further particulars.

"Little news that can be depended upon has reached me from the Turon, for the diggers have been so short a time there as yet, that they have not commenced coming in in any force. Every account, however, agrees in one respect, which is, that the fine gold is found in much greater abundance than at the Summer Hill Creek, and that it is much more easily extracted from the soil."

25 June 1851

BATHURST. We see, comparatively speaking, but little of the gold diggers now to what we saw a week ago; the stream, Both up and down, having diminished to a mere driblet

Little news that can be depended upon has reached me from the Turon, for the diggers have been so short a time there as yet, that they have not commenced coming in in any force. Every account, however, agrees in one respect, which is, that the fine gold is found in much greater abundance than at the Summer Hill Creek, and that it is much more easily extracted from the soil.

I have heard that no lumps of any size have, however, as yet been discovered ; but the digging’s there are quite in their infancy, and little doubt exists that they will come upon them after a short time.

The drays that come from down the country on their road to the Turon, seldom reach our side of the river, but mostly turn off on the Kelso side, so that my opportunities of forming a correct estimate as to the amount of traffic there is on the road is but imperfect, but I hear the number of diggers is considerably on the increase.

I think “that after the, lesson which has been taught them at the Ophir dig gings, there will not bo nearly so many anxious to ince the Turon during the present severe weather, but in the spring there is no doubt they will increase very rapidly ; as, however, a residence might prove unpleasant there just now, it would, I understand, in the summer bo very delightful.

The last accounts from Ophir are the reverse of encouraging, and many whom I thought hardy enough to stand almost anything, have left within the last few days. Trio stream has risen nearly three feet above the bed of the Creek, consequently the best of the diggings will not be come-at-able until it subsides.

The weather there has been very cold, and on Saturday last a person whoso name I have not been able to get at, died from cramp in the stomach, induced by the se veri ty of the weather. He is stated to have belonged to Mr. Mtnahnu’s party, and my informant met the Coroner on the road, intending to hold an inquest on the body. I hear that some few cradles have been smashed, belonging to parties who had not paid the license fee.

A man named Peter M’Clusky, with two aliases to his nanu», was taken there under a warrant from the Sydney Bench, charging him with horse-steal ng. The weather in Bathurst at the present time is bitterly cold, which will throw a consider able damp on our mining operations as long as it continues. No person without experiencing the discomfort of lying on hard damp ground on cold wintry nights onultl properly appre ciate the hardship of a gold digger s life at this inclement season of the venr; nor woultl a person who had merely lived in Sydney, or within a few miles of it, ever believe that about a hundred and twenty miles would ever make such a difference in the climateFix this text as exists between this town and the towns down the country._

"There are gathered over a wide extent of country a mass of human beings variously estimated by different calculators at from 800 to 1500 souls. But this dispersion is not so much a matter of choice as of necessity.

The long intervals between the water holes, not only in the Turon Rivulet, but in the Oakey Creek, Two-mile Creek, and Crudine Creek, render it impossible to conduct mining operations, except in localities distant from each other.

16 July 1851

TURON DIGGINGS.

From various and respectable sources we have gleaned the following items of informa tion respecting the present state of the Turon Diggings.

The immediate and most obvious effect of the new discoveries is a general dispersion of the mining population over a large extent of country, but none have contributed so largely to produce this result as the discovery of the gold fields of the Turon.

There are gathered over a wide extent of country a mass of human beings variously estimated by different calculators at from 800 to 1500 souls. But this dispersion is not so much a matter of choice as of necessity.

The long intervals between the water holes, not only in the Turon rivulet, but in the Oakey Creek, Two-mile Creek, and Crudine Creek, render it impossible to con duct mining operations, except in localities distant from each other.

The consequence is that wherever there is the greatest extent of water frontage the largest number of miners are assembled, and to a traveller the sight is a very interesting one, of a large mass of men laboriously and most sedulously occupied in groups of 50, 100, and where water is abundant as many as 150, in a wild and rugged country, which, until within the last few weeks was the seat of silence and solitude.

Whatever direction you may take in your rambles through the hills, you may unexpectedly stumble upon a small knot of busy men located upon a water hole, addressing themselves to their golden pursuits with characteristic diligence. The great body of the miners aro scattered over about ten miles of the Turon rivulet, but there are parties at work in every quarter. We learn from Mr. Cummings that there are about one hundred and fifty men now at work at the junction of the Turon with the Macquarie.

He had with him a piece of the precious metal weighing about an ounce, which had been procured there the day before. This is the only piece of any size which has been found there, or which is worth dignifying with that ugly little appellation “ nugget.” As Mr. Cummings is doing a flourishing busi ness in mutton we presume a corresponding change in his sentiments relative to the gold discovery has taken place.

The principle group are as yet assembled about the Wallaby Rocks, owing to the prevalence to a greater extent than in any other spot yet discovered of the two prime requsites - gold and water. Except at the junction, there are comparatively few down the river.

Our in formant states that he unexpectedly stumbled on a party working by themselves in a quiet comer, a considerable distance down the river, where they had a good supply of water and were doing well. He know a few parties who had been getting an ounce a day each, but these were extreme instances.

Several teams from Maitland had arrived within the last few days, and one individual from that town had opened a large store immediately upon his arrival. The issue of the licenses, and the collection of the fees, were proceeding peaceably ; but there was nevertheless a good deal of passive resistance. Every description of scheme and trick was resorted to by some to shirk the payment.

Those who are doing very well . have little inducement to scheme, and there fore come forward voluntarily to take out their licenses ; but there are some, and always will bo, who doing either indifferently or mode rately well, are seriously affected by the monthly tax of 30s., and it is not surprising that they do their best to avoid payment. In such cases, many of the diggers suddenly be come idle spectators when the Commissioner heaves in sight, and affect to be gazing at anything about them in stupid wonder. Others scamper offinto the bush, and deposit their bodies behind tree, returning to their labour when he has disappeared. In one way or another many evade payment altogether.

The earnings of the miners generally have not been overrated in our reports, but rather the reverse. A gentleman of undoubted vera city, recently returned from the Turon, in forms us that the party to which he belonged had been procuring an ounce of gold a day each, for some time past. He mentioned the names of several others who had been equally fortunate, and informed as that he had an ounce in his pocket which had been pro cured by his son, who was at work by him self, in one day.

Many of his neighbours, he stated, were earning £1 per day, and a man must be a “ crawler” who did not make 10s. ! But from nil we have heard, the gentleman in ‘ question has been at work in about the most ‘ productive spot yet discovered. From another respectable individual, who has devoted some attention to the subject, and taken pains to ascertain the general earnings of the Turon miners, we learn that they vary greatly at different points of the river, and that where water was plentiful and the diggings conve nient thereto, they were making the most money. He fixes upon 5s. as the lowest, and rises to 30s. as the highest daily earnings. Isolated cases of a higher rate, he says, may occur, but they are too few in number to found a rule upon. Several individuals have men employed, to whom they pay wages. Messrs.

Want and Redman have about ten men at work on these terms, and are doing well. They are located near the second Wallaby Rocks. One party had a pump at work with a spout eight feet long, and were pretty successful. There was very little water about the place, but they sup plied their wants by digging a hole in the bed of the creek, from which they procured suf ficient for washing, cooking, &c. In many places the water is so scarce that the men were filling up the holes with the refuse from their cradles. On Sunday and Monday last, from forty to fifty Sydney people started back home. Many of them appear utterly helpless when they arrive at the mines, and remain there for a few days only, to cat up a portion of their supplies, and sacrifice the remainder.

How many of them mustered courage to get through the journey up is astonishing, for one glance at the diggings apnears to paralyse them. As regards the public peace, the very best order prevails. On Tuesday night last a con cert was got up, for admittance to which a trifling charge was made. There are several females at the diggings. A professional gen tleman from the metropolis, accompanied by his young and blushing bride, is now rusti cating at the Turon, and it is said is very suc cessful in his digging operations. The party with whom he is connected have earned good wages.

"Now that a regular Post Office is established the people at the diggings will no longer h«ve to complain about having to travel the rounds of half the stores on the Turon for their letters and papers. Mr. King, the Assistant Commissioner, is appointed Postmaster and the Post Office is held at his tent."

27 August 1851

TURON.

In my recent prospecting tour, I was acompanied by my neighbour Shortill, of the Coach and Horses, who followed in my track for a few days, until, what with blisters and disappointment, he got sick at heart and re turned to the Cross-roads to console his cus tomers -with ramin:s:cnccs of the toils and drudgery by fljod and fi J.1 which ho had undergone at the Turon.

What must be espe cially gratifying to him, will be to learn, that the “hole vacated by him to go a prospecting, has since been wovked by four men, who have procured their twelve ounces a-day.

Satisfied with ti e “nducements of such a locality, I have secured the next claim to it. Convenient to the place, Cook and his pariy of four made nearly £100 in one day.

Ther good fortune has “been uninterrupted ever since their arrival. That many and very many people here are doing, some well and others exceedingly well, both on the Turon and its tr.butaries, it would be useless to deny ; but you may inform the readers of the Free Press that that the information given you by Mr. Dargin, which was published in a late paper, is quite correct.

There are hundreds whose labour is not paying their expenses, and it would be cruel to hide this fact from the public. It is true this change for the worse has not taken place long, but it is high time you announced it, so as to give those who intend trying their fortunes at the Turon a fair opportunity of making their election.

The discovery of rich deposits on the Me roo Creek is causing a great ferment here. People are rushing there by hundreds, and a visible thinning of the digging population has taken place in some of the richest points of the Turon.

The intelligence appears to have acted like magic upon the constitution of the miners, and reminds me of the midnight flit ! tings from the Wallaby Rocks to Golden J Point, when the lntter locality was first disco vered. Tents are struck by the dozen, and teams are leaving by the score, so that for a time at least I expect we shall have a little moro elbow-room.

A Mr. Davidson, late of Wellington, and party have been doing very well of late, and you will no doubt be surprised to learn the origin of their success. The spot where their golden earnings were procured was discovered by what you newspaper paragraph wrriters denominate a “serious accident,” but which, as the event showed, proved a lucky one.

Whilst riding along the river Mr. Davidson’s horse stum bled, und threw his rider. The stone was displaced by the concu-sion, and the richness of the spot at once stood revealed. The party availed themselves of this accidental discovery, and I am respectably informed that Mr. Davidson’s share of the accident was £74 worth of gold, and a “burster.”

Now that a regular Post Office is established the people at the diggings will no longer h«ve to complain about having to travel the rounds of half the stores on the Turon for their letters and papers. Mr. King, the Assistant Commissioner, is appointed Postmaster and the Post Office is held at his tent.

"This morning Mr. Woodward started into Bathurst, with eighty ounces of gold, procured from his claim at Golden Point, in six days.

"It is astonishing the quantity of gold that has been taken from this claim; and instead of working out it appears on the contrary to be getting better every week."

18 September 1851

TURON. NEALE’S POINT

This morning Mr. Woodward started into Bathurst, with eighty ounces of gold, procured from his claim at Golden Point, in six days).

It is astonishing the quantity of gold that has been taken from this claim; and instead of working out it appears on the contrary to be getting better every week

He also sold a claim behind him1, , during the week, for £120. A squabble took ‘ place the other day between two ladies living in our neighbourhood, and a summons has been issued at the instance of one of them, for an assault.

The case will be heard on Monday, unless -in the meantime mature reflection should convince them that these matters are anything but p’easant or seemly cases for public decision by a Beach of magistrates.

On our point the daily subsidence of the water ii a considerable advantage, as the diggers are enabled to get deeper into their work ; and I have not the slightest doubt that the bed diggings \»ith us will prove very productive, as soon as we are enabled to sink a sufficient depth.

Some of those working the bed near the bank are already finding their account in doing so. All night the wind blew terrifically in sudden gusts, and three or four trecä were blown down in the bed of the river opposite us The night was a most uncomfortable one for any persons whose tent appeared to be at all open.

"A comfortable building has been erected by the Catholics, and roofed in with canvass, for puposes of religious worship. An enormous oven, larger than say in Bathurst, furnishes ample and remunerative employment for a bevy of bakers, and smoking hot loaves for the diggers of Sofala."

6 November 1851

THE TURON.

THE rains’of last week and the week previous have caused an almost general suspension of operations at the Turon. In consequence of which there is little gold being dug, not much selling, and a general blackness of trade.

Great numbers moreover uro gradually drawing away to their farms. During the last fortnight it is calculated that not less than 600 people left the Turon at different points, many of them for the neighbourhood of Maitland and t’io Hunter, to” attend to their agricultural operations, and more are preparing to follow.

The building intended by Mr. Quail for an inn is nearly complete, and is a surprising advance in the architecture of the Turon.

A comfortable building has been erected by the Catholics, and roofed in with canvass, for puposes of religious worship. An enormous oven, larger than say in Bathurst, furnishes ample and remunerative employment for a bevy of bakers, and smoking hot loaves for the diggers of Sofala.

Boarding houses offer ing accommodation for min, and stables ditto for boost, are beooming very numerous.

The printing press, I understand, will shortly be eatablishcd at Sofala. Mr. Cunninghame, of the Advocate ollico, Sydney, is about to open an office, but whether to publish a paper or not I have not yet heard.

It is also reported that Mr. Pickering, of Hell’s Life in Sydney, in tends commencing a newspaper here, but with what truth I cannot say. Divino service was held by the Lord Bishop of Sydney on Sunday last, at the Commis sioner’s tent, and, notwithstanding the incle mency of the weather, upwards of 200 attended. At the conclusion of the sermon’ his Lordship delivered a short address explanatory of the progress he had made in, . behalf of the Church at the Turon.

Arrange ments were made for the erection of a wooden building, to be dedicated to Protestant worship, I capable of containing 200 to 250 people. He’ j trusted lint on the following Sabbath, ts con duct Divine Service within its walls. The dimension» of the building are sixty-six feet by twenty- jne.

The Rev. Mr. Blair, from Sydney, conducted religious worship at the Sheep Station Point in the morning, und at Sofala m the afternoon. His tninUtrationi were very numerously at tended.

The Rev. Mr. Pcmoll, from Bathurst, had very large congregations, who appeared to take great interest ¡ii the pro ceedings. In the course of the day, no less than. 2000 people attcude«l the services, which were conducted by the different ministers of religion ; and to a pmon who has seen the Turon as it was, the marked improvement in the general demeanour of the diggers, must bo very striking. So for as I rould observo peace nn order prevailed everywhere.

Respecting the digging themselves, chantres arc constantly taking place. Many of the points are nearly deserted, much of the best ground having been worked out. The digging population in the vicnity of Sofala is not nearly so numerous as formerly, whilst people about Sheepstation Point are gradually thick ening.

The effron’cry with which sly grog-selling is conducted nt Sofala and the surroumliiig country is altogether surprising, and argues great laxity on the part of the authorities. I 1 am thoroughly convinced that there is much moro liquor drunk in the mountains of the Turon than in the town of Bathurst. SeTcral .

I parties havo lately been fined tot sly grog- . selling, and among the rent, Mew«. Wood ana [ Lucas-Mr. Woo«! for the second offence. ‘ I Mr. Nicholson, the District Surveyor, is now employed at Sofala in laying out the township,

"About a week since, a man named Marcus Lynch, aged twenty-seven years, died from in flammation of the bowels, at Maitland Point, and was buried at Golden Point.

"It is necessary that a piece of land, about a mile from the river, should be granted for a burial ground, and I believe that it is the intention of the Rev. Mr. Palmer that application shall be made for a site."

22 November 1851

TURON. NEALE’S POINT

The weather is still very variable, being showery every day; notwithstanding this, I am happy to say the river is subsiding quickly, and filling the hearts of the unfortunate holders of bed claims with hopes that they will soon be rewarded for the persevering pertinacity with which they have clung to their flooded claims.

Many have held such claims for the last four months, at an actual loss, and it is much to be hoped that they will upon being enabled to work them, find them fully answer their expectations. Out of one of them on our point, a party on Friday, after managing to get the water down, found a nugget weighing twelve ounces.

Yesterday they got in all seventeen ounces and a-half out of the same claim. In the claim next but one to them, a party of six Cornish miners by dint of extremely severe labour, procured ninety-five pounds worth each man, in the space of about five weeks.

In these claims, however, the gold is found nearer the bank than in the claims lower down, conse quently the water is much more easily kept down. Opposite the Upper Wallaby Rocks some claims have just been opened on the bank, from two to three hundred yards from the river ; how they will turn out is at present rather questionable, but I am myself inclined to think favorably of them.

At one, which is just opened, two long Toms are employed, and appear to answer well; carrying through a great deal more stuff than the common cradle. About a week since, a man named Marcus Lynch, aged twenty-seven years, died from in flammation of the bowels, at Maitland Point, and was buried at Golden Point.

It is necessary that a piece of land, about a mile from the river, should be granted for a burial ground, and I believe that it is the intention of the Rev. Mr. Palmer that application shall be made for a site.

On Sunday evening a person named Shore, formerly in the Bathurst police, fell into a bank digging on our point, by which his shoulder was severely hurt, his leg and face also being considerably bruised.

A few days back a woman living at Oakey Creek, was safely delivered of twins, one of whom was named Henry Oakey, and the other John Turon. Henry Oakey lived only for a couple of days, but the other is doing well. Mr. Jones, the equestrian, is building a circus on the flat opposite the junction of Oakey Creek; and I think the locality is well chosen, and that the specula tion is likely to prove remunerative.

A con viction for illegally selling spirits took place yesterday, and the party was fined thirty pounds and costs. Another information was on the file against a person who, it appears, sold a bottle of lemon syrup, and gave a bottle of grog in. This case was postponed. A re port, which I believe to be well founded, is cur rent in this neighbourhood, that a piece of gold, upwards of twenty-seven pounds weight, was picked up at Louisa Creek, and that the fortu nate finder had been offered £1250 for it!

A person, formerly on the Turon, was here yes terday, and told me that he and ‘my party cleared £170 each last month at Louisa. He started again to-day for that locality. A good many people are about leaving the Turon for Louisa Creek and the Araluen diggings; and horse-flesh is rising rapidly in consequence.

A meeting was held at the Church to-day for the election of churchwardens, when William Hardy, Esq., was selected by the Commis sioners, and G. Smythe, Esq.,by the subscribers. The Rev. Mr. Palmer has not as yet selected the third. Very few persons were in atten dance, but the weather waa most unpropitious; and moreover the knowledge that the meeting was to take place was almost entirely confined to those persons who attended Church last Sunday, which circumstance might in a mea sure account for the paucity of attendance.

"Sofala is now just beginning to assume the appearance of a real town, there being two main streets, with many slabbed buildings of respectable appearance, and every day new structures may be seen raising their heads."

1 December 1851

TURON. NEALE’S POINT

Sofala is now just beginning to assume the appearance of a real town, there being two main streets, with many slabbed buildings of respectable appearance, and every day new structures may be seen raising their heads.

The Episcopalian Church is progressing fast, and when completed will give to the scene a homeliness and sort of enchantment, which may be felt, but can hardly be described

It is a simple structure, composed of split stuff and canvas, and possesses attractions in my eyes even from its very simplicity. It is erecting on a piece of rising ground just beyond the Post Office, and commands a limited but pleasing view of the surrounding ranges. The Post Office is a miserable slabbed building, inconvenient, in secure, and reminding one more of a cow-shed or fourth-class stable, than any thing else.

The man whose both legs were broken on Monday evening was named Matthew Wb, and belonged to Bathurst ; the fractures have been reduced, and he is doing as well as could be expected. A meeting, at which Mr. Rudder presided, was held at our point this evening, when it was earned by a show of hands, that the river for about five hundred yards down should be cleared to a depth of two feet six inches, and a width of eight feet.

The motion was strongly opposed, as it is not only con sidered almost impracticable from the quantity of rock that will have to be removed, but also that its being deepened to that extent will prove detrimental to the interests of some of the bed claimants. A very sensible amend ment by Mr. Allwood, to the effect that the tailings from the cradles only be removed, and the course of the river kept clear in future, was negatived.

The dry weather appears to have fully commenced, and in a month’s time I expect there will be a cry out, not that there is too much water, but too little. The bank diggings opposite the Upper Wallaby Rocks are beginning to turn out very well, and the point is already bristling with tents.

It is currently reported here that a man has died from the bite of a snake up at Mundy Point, but I can not vouch for its correctness. I have seen a great many of these venomous reptiles about, but this is the first accident of the kind I have heard of here.

A fine nugget, weighing four teen ounces, was picked up at Little Oakey Creek the other day. Mr. Rudder’s son and nephew have just returned from a visit to the Abercrombie diggings, of which they give any thing but a favourable account. Three specimens of gold and quartz came in yesterday evening from Louisa Creek.

One is said to weigh twenty eight pounds, another twenty-six, and the third is smaller. It is estimated that at least one-half is gold. A man with a horse- team, from Bathurst, had both his legs broken yes terday afternoon, about three miles from Sofala.

It appears that he was on the dray regulating some of the loading, when he slipped forward under the wheel, which broke the right leg a little below the knee, and the left one just above the ankle. I have not as yet been able to leam his name. The fractures were temporarily bandaged by Doctors Johnson, Sael, and Whitehead, and he was immediately removed to Golden Point.